Skip to main content

Full text of "Carver College Annual Catalogue [1959-1960]"

See other formats


COLLEGE 


ANNUAL CATALOGUE 



501 SOUTH ALEXANDER STREET 
CHARLOTTE 6, NORTH CAROLINA 


Digitized by the Internet Archive 
in 2016 with funding from 
North Carolina Digital Heritage Center 


https://archive.org/details/carvercollegeann11carv 


CARVER COLLEGE 


A Two-Year junior College, under the Charlotte Community 
College System, offering courses in Pre-Professional Training, 
General Education, Vocational-Industrial Education, Adult 
Education, and Community Education 


Member of 

The North Carolina College Conference 
Association of Collegiate Deans and Registrars 
American Association of Junior Colleges 
American Association of Higher Education 



Accredited hy 

The North Carolina State Department of Education 


TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Calendar of Events 5-6 

Board of Trustees 7 

Founders’ Day 7 

Administrative Staff 8 

College Instructional Staff 9-10 

High School Instructional Staff . 10 

Adult Educational Instructional Staff 10 

Other Employees 10 

Maintenance 11 

Citations for Meritorious Service 11 

Scholarship Fund Committee 11 

Scholarships and Awards 11-12 

Honor Society 13 

COMMITTEES OF THE FACULTY 13-14 

General Information 15 

Objectives of the College 15 

Location 15 

Library Facilities 15-16 

Counseling and Guidance 16 

Accreditation 16 

Veterans’ Education 16-17 

Education for Vocationally Handicapped 17 

Employment Service 17 

General Regulations 18 

Application for Admission 18 

Placement Examinations 18 

Registration 18 

CHANGE OF NAME OR ADDRESS 18 

Change of Program 18 

Examinations 18 

Probation 19 

Scholarships and Grades . 19-20 

Attendance Requirements 20 

Transfer of College Credits 20 

Medical Care 20 

Expenses 20-22 

Daytime Classes 22 

Special Students 22 

Schedule of Classes 22 

Withdrawal 22 

Honor Roll 22 

Graduation Requirements 23 

Students Activities 23 

Student Government 23 

Dramatics 23 

Newspaper 24 


TABLE OF CONTENTS— continued 

College Yearbook 24 

Athletics 24 

Recreation 24 

Honor Society 24 

Music 24-25 

SCHOLARSHIPS 25 

STUDENT LOAN 25 

Programs of Study 25-30 

Liberal Arts (University Parallel) 27 

Business Administration (University Parallel) 28 

Business Education (University Parallel) 28 

Pre-Engineering (University Parallel) 29 

Business Administration and Accounting (Terminal) 30 

Secretarial Science (Terminal) 30 

Courses of Instruction 31 

Business 31 

Education and Psychology 32 

English 33 

Foreign Languages 33 

French 33 

German 33 

I lumanities 34 

Mathematics 34 

College Algebra 34 

Plane Trigonometry 34 

Mechanical Engineering 35 

Natural Sciences 35-36 

Survey of Biological Science 35 

Survey of Physical Science 35 

Botany 35 

Zoology 35 

Anatomy and Physiology 35 

Chemistry 36 

Physics 36 

Qualitative Chemical Analysis 36 

Quantitative Chemical Analysis 36 

Philosophy 36 

Logic 36 

Physical Education 36 

Religious Education 37 

Social Sciences 37-38 

Economics 37 

Geography 37 

Survey of Social Science 37 

History 37 

American Government 37 

Principles of Sociology 38 


3 


TABLE OF CONTENTS— continued 

Adult Education 38-39 

Auto Mechanics 38 

Dressmaking 38 

Play Production 38 

Tailoring 39 

Typewriting 39 

Business Management Institute 39 

Second Ward Accelerated High School 40-45 

General Information 40 

Classes 40 

Full-Time Students 40 

Part-Time Sutdents 40 

Requirements for Graduation 41 

Courses of Study 41 

Description of Courses 42-43 

Basic Reading Skills 42 

Description of Trade Courses 44 

Auto Mechanics 44 

Brick Masonry 44 

Scale For Grading . 45 

Fees 45 

Roster of Students 46 

College Graduates 46 

High School Graduates 47 

Vocational Education Graduates 47 

Advanced Freshmen 48 

Freshmen 48-50 

Specials 50 

Business Management Institute 50-51 

Extension Di\asion, A. & T. College 

High School 51-52 

Specials 52 

Summer School, 1958 . 52-53 

Summary of Student Enrollment 54 

Summary of Graduates 54 


4 


CALENDAR OF EVENTS 
1959 - 1960 

FALL QUARTER, 1959 

September 8-11 Registration of Returning Students 

September 16-18 Orientation of New Students 

September 21 Registration of New Students 

September 22 Registration of Other Students 

September 23 First Day of Classes 

November 25-29 Thanksgiving Recess 

December 7-11 Registration of New and Returning Students 

for Winter Quarter, 1960 

December 14 Last Day of Classes 

December 15-17 Final Examinations 

December 17 Orientation of New Students 

December 18-January 3 Christmas Vacation 

WINTER QUARTER, 1960 

January 4 Registration of Other Students 

January 5 First Day of Classes 

March 7-11 Registration of New Returning Students 

for Spring Quarter, 1960 

March 14 Last Day of Classes 

March 15-17 Final Examinations 

SPRING QUARTER, 1960 

March 17 Orientation of New Students 

March 18 Registration of Other Students 

March 21 First Day of Classes 

April 10 Founders’ Day 

April 15-18 Easter Vacation 

May 23-27 Registration of New and Returning Students 

for 1st Summer Term, 1960 

May 31 Last Day of Classes 

June 1-3 Final Examinations 

June 5-7 Graduation Exercises 

SUMMER SESSION, 1960 

FIRST SUMMER TERM 

June 6-7 Registration 

June 8 First Day of Classes 

July 4 Holiday for Independence Day 

July 13 Last Day of Classes 

July 14-15 Final Examinations 

SECOND SUMMER TERM 

July 18 Registration 

July 19 First Day of Classes 

August 22 Last Day of Classes 

August 23-24 Final Examinations 


5 


SECOND WARD ACCELERATED HIGH SCHOOL 
Calendar of Events 
1959 - 1960 

FIRST SEMESTER 

September 18 

September 23 

November 25-29 

December 18-January 3 
February 10, 11, 12 . 

February 15 


Registration 

First Day of Classes 
Thanksgiving Recess 
Christmas Vacation 
Final Examinations 
. End of Semester 


SECOND SEMESTER 


February 16 Registration and First Day of Qasses 

April 15-18 Easter Vacation 

June 16, 17, 20 Final Examinations 

June 22 End of Semester 


CALENDAR 1959-1960 



SEPTEMBER 




OCTOBER 




NOVEMBER 


s 

M 

T 

W 

T 

F 

S 

S 

M 

T 

W 

T 

F 

S 

S 

M 

T 

W 

T 

F 

S 



1 

2 

3 

4 

s 





1 

2 

3 

1 

2 

3 

4 

S 

6 

7 

6 

7 

8 

9 

10 

11 

12 

4 

S 

6 

7 

8 

9 

10 

8 

9 

10 

11 

12 

13 

14 

13 

14 

IS 

16 

17 

18 

19 

11 

12 

13 

14 

IS 

16 

17 

IS 

16 

17 

18 

19 

20 

21 

20 

21 

22 

23 

24 

2S 

26 

18 

19 

20 

21 

22 

23 

24 

22 

23 

24 

2S 

26 

27 

28 

27 

28 

29 

30 




2S 

26 

27 

28 

29 

30 

31 

29 

30 







DECEMBER 




JANUARY 




FEBRUARY 


S 

M 

T 

W 

T 

F 

S 

S 

M 

T 

W 

T 

F 

S 

S 

M 

T 

W 

T 

F 

S 



1 

2 

3 

4 

S 






1 

2 


1 

2 

3 

4 

S 

6 

6 

7 

8 

9 

10 

11 

12 

3 

4 

S 

6 

7 

8 

9 

7 

8 

9 

10 

11 

12 

13 

13 

14 

IS 

16 

17 

18 

19 

10 

11 

12 

13 

14 

IS 

16 

14 

IS 

16 

17 

18 

19 

20 

20 

21 

22 

23 

24 

2S 

26 

17 

18 

19 

20 

21 

22 

23 

21 

22 

23 

24 

2S 

26 

27 

27 

28 

29 

30 

31 



24 

2S 

26 

27 

28 

29 

30 

28 

29 













31 
















MARCH 





APRIL 





MAY 



S 

M 

T 

W 

T 

F 

S 

S 

M 

T 

W 

T 

F 

S 

S 

M 

T 

W 

T 

F 

S 



1 

2 

3 

4 

S 






1 

2 

1 

2 

3 

4 

S 

6 

7 

6 

7 

8 

9 

10 

11 

12 

3 

4 

S 

6 

7 

8 

9 

8 

9 

10 

11 

12 

13 

14 

13 

14 

IS 

16 

17 

18 

19 

10 

11 

12 

13 

14 

IS 

16 

IS 

16 

17 

18 

19 

20 

21 

20 

21 

22 

23 

24 

2S 

26 

17 

18 

19 

20 

21 

22 

23 

22 

23 

24 

2S 

26 

27 

28 

27 

28 

29 

30 

31 



24 

2S 

26 

27 

28 

29 

30 

29 

30 

31 







JUNE 





JULY 





AUGUST 



S 

M 

T 

W 

T 

F 

S 

S 

M 

T 

W 

T 

F 

S 

S 

M 

T 

w 

T 

F 

S 




1 

2 

3 

4 






1 

2 


1 

2 

3 

4 

S 

6 

S 

6 

7 

8 

9 

10 

11 

3 

4 

S 

6 

7 

8 

9 

7 

8 

9 

10 

11 

12 

13 

12 

13 

14 

IS 

16 

17 

18 

10 

11 

12 

13 

14 

IS 

16 

14 

IS 

16 

17 

18 

19 

20 

19 

20 

21 

22 

23 

24 

2S 

17 

18 

19 

20 

21 

22 

23 

21 

22 

23 

24 

25 

26 

27 

26 

27 

28 

29 

30 



24 

2S 

26 

27 

28 

29 

30 

28 

29 

30 

31 











31 















6 


CARVER COLLEGE 


BOARD ( 

J. Murrey Atkins, Chairman 
Dr. Ernest A. Beaty 
Thomas M. Belk 
Linn D. Garibaldi 
John Paul Lucas 
John A. McRae, Sr. 

Dr. Elmer H. 


TRUSTEES 

Cecil Prince 
Addison H. Reese 
Oliver Rowe 
Sheldon P. Smith 
Robert L. Taylor 
Dr. Thomas Watkins, Sr. 
LRiNGER, Secretary 


Tenth Anniversary 

FOUNDERS’ DAY EXERCISES 

"Looking Ahead" 

Friday Evening, April 10, 1959 
Carver College Auditorium, Eight O’clock 


PROGRAM 

Dr. Edward H. Brown, Director, Presiding 
Academic Procession 

GRAND MARCH from “Aida” Verdi 

Invocation Reverend Herman L. Counts 

Greetings from the Faculty Mr. Nigel M. Ayton 

Music Carver College Choir 

ALL GLORY BE TO THEE, MOST HIGH-Howorth 

Early History of the College Dr. Elmer H. Garinger 

Superintendent of Charlotte City Schools 

Greetings from the Board of Trustees Mr. J. Murrey Atkins, Chairman 

Greetings from the First Graduating Class Mr. Kenneth Norton, President 

1951 Student Council 

Greetings from the Alumni Association Mr. Isaac Ware, ’58 

Poll of the classes 

Music Carver College Choir 

LET THERE BE PEACE ON EARTH-Jachson and MiUer 
Introduction of Speaker 
The Address 

THE GREAT FUTURE OF CHARLOTTE, NORTH CAROLINA 
Mr. Harry L. Golden, Editor 
The Carolina Israelite 


Solo RIDE ON KING JESUS-Gaul 

Mr. Charles C. McRae, Class of 1952 
Mrs. Margaret DeMont Beckwith, Accompanist 

Benediction Dr. A. J. Ryans, Pastor 

Ebenezer Baptist Church 

Recessional TANNHAUSER MARCH Wagner 

(The audience is requested to remain seated until the academic recessional is 
completed.) 


7 


Administrative Staff 


Edward Howard Brown Director 

B.S., Johnson C. Smith University 
M.A., Columbia University 
Ed.D., Columbia University 


Anna M. Hood Secretary to the Director 

B.S., South Carolina State College 

James F. Alexander Director of Admissions and Registrar 

B.S., Johnson C. Smith University 

Loretta Crowder Clerk 

A.A., Carver College 

James L. Douglas Bursar 


Bernard L. Brown Coordinator of Student Welfare 

and Student Activities 

A.B., Johnson C. Smith University 
M.A., Columbia University 


Mary P. Spivey Coordinator of Accelerated High School 

and Adult Education 

B.S., Livingstone College 


Evelyn Willis Coordinator of Testing and Placement 

A.B., Spelman College 
M.S., Howard University 


Laura M. Booton Coordinator of Veterans Affairs 

B.S., Hampton Institute 

Dorothy R. Crawford Librarian and Secretary to the Faculty 

A.B., Knoxvtille College 

M.S. in L.S., Catholic University 


Jacqueline A. Pharr Coordinator of Public Relations 

B.S., Johnson C. Smith University 

Ethel M. Potts Coordinator of Basic Education 

A.B., Johnson C. Smith University 


Lorenzo Alexander George 

A.A., Carver College 


Coordinator of Audio-Visual Aids 
and Bookstore Manager 


Edward Walker, Jr. Coordinator of Trade 

and Industrial Education 

A. B., Hampton Institute 
M.A., Wa)me University 

Emery L. Rann College Physicicm 

B. S., Johnston C. Smith University 
M.S., University of Michigan 
M.D., Meharry Medical College 


8 


INSTRUCTIONAL STAFF 
College 

Brown, Edward Howard Director 

B.S., Johnson C. Smith University 
M.A., Columbia University 
Ed.D., Columbia University 

Allen, David P Physical Science 

A.B., Johnson C. Smith University 
M.D., Meharry Medical College 

Ayton, Nigel Melvin French 

A. B., Howard University 

Certificate de francais. University of Paris 

Booton, Laura M Business Administration 

B. S. Hampton Institute 

Brown, Bernard L Social Science 

A. B., Johnson C. Smith University 
M.A., Columbia University 

Carter, Robert Business Administration 

B. S., North Carolina College 

Counts, Herman L Religious Education 

A. B., Johnson C. Smith University 

B. D., Johnson C. Smith University 
M.A., McCormick Theological Seminar}^ 

Crawford, Dorothy R Librarian 

A. B., Knoxville College 

M.S. in L.S., Catholic University 

Hughes, Mary Coles Mathematics 

B. S., Johnson C. Smith University 

’^Hunter, David L Mathematics 

A. B., Johnston C. Smith University 

Levi, Louis E Chemistry 

B. S., Talledega College 
M.A., University of Minnesota 

Lewis, James A Engineering Drawing 

B.S., A. & T. College 

McCaskill, Marjorie S Business Education 

B.S., South Carolina State College 
M.S., New York University 

McKinney, Martha L English 

B.A., Johnson C. Smith University 
M.A., Columbia University 

Perry, Pennie E Humanities 

B.S., Shaw University 

M.S., University of Michigan 

M.S. in L.S., Syracuse University 


On leave 1959-1960. 


9 


Pharr, Jacqueline Zoology, Botany 

B.S., Johnson C. Smith University 

Robinson, Odell W Basketball Coach 

B.S., Johnson C. Smith University 

Rorie, Raymond P Zoology, Botany 

B.S., A. and T. College 
M.S., New York University 

Spivey, Mary P Mathematics 

B.S., Livingstone College 

Towns, Joseph F Social Science 

A. B., Johnson C. Smith University 
M.S., University of Michigan 

Watkins, Jeanne J Speech 

B. S., Hampton Institute 
M.A., Syracuse University 

Watkins, Thomas, Jr French, German 

A.B., Harvard University 
D.D.S., University of Pennsylvania 

Willis, Evelyn Education, Psychology 

A.B., Spelman College 
M.S., Howard University 

Yongue, Imogene T English 

A. B., Spelman College 
M.A., New York University 

High School 

Cohen, Ernest H Brick Masonry 

B. S., Florida A. and M. University 

Potts, Ethel M Social Sciences 

A. B., Johnson C. Smith University 

Spivey, Mary P. Mathematics, Science 

B. S., Livingstone College 

Walker, Edward, Jr Auto Mechanics 

A.B., Hampton Institute 
M.A.,, Wayne Llniversity 


Adult Education 

Reid, Paul L. Music 

B.S., Johnson C. Smith University 

Tarpley, Prances M Clothing 

B.S., Barber- Scotia College 


Other Employees 

Burris, Annie Ellen Library Assistant 

A.A., Carver College 

Byars, Doris Library Assistant 

A.A., Carver College 


10 


Maintenance 


Little, Thomas J. Custodian 

Heath, Purcell Janitor 


RECIPIENTS OF 

CITATIONS FOR MERITORIOUS SERVICE 


Mrs. Willie Mae Porter News Reporter 

Mrs. Vinie Watkins Principal, Billingsville School 

Dr. J. F. Wertz Minister, Saint Paul Baptist Church 

Mr. S. P. Woodard Civic Worker 

Mrs. A. Z. Zanders P. T. A. Worker 


The Carver College Scholarship Fund Committee 


Mrs. Edmonia Saunders Peterson 

Mrs. Delcenia Murray 

Mrs. Irene Hunter Jones 

Mrs. Cleo A. Yongue 

Mr. William Cathey 

Mrs. Annie Boulware 
Mrs. William Cathey 
Mrs. Mamie Dunn 
Miss Corine Grier 


Chairman 

Vice-Chairman 

Secretary 

Assistant Secretary 

Treasurer 

Mrs. Ada Gunn 

Mrs. Martha Johnson 

Mr. and Mrs. William Mitchell 


SCHOLARSHIPS AND AWARDS 
Special Scholarships and Awards 

Alpha Lambda Omega Chapter— Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority Scholarship 
Award of $100.00 Hazel Bailey, Doris Cathcart 

Alpha Gamma Chi Sorority Scholarship Award of $50.00 
Delores Witherspoon 

Irwin Belk Scholarship Awards . . .Willie Mae Lindsay, Raymond Mason 

J. B. Ivey Department Store Scholarship Awards 
Calvin Harris David Thompson Jerome Gentry 

The Arthur S. Grier Trophy James E. Davis 

Highest ranking student in Business Administration Department 

Underwood Award of Merit Sarnie Lee Grier 

Most outstanding Business Education student 

Underwood Best Typist Award Loretta Crowder 

The Dr. John Robert Gregg Shorthand Medals Eddie Lee Rivers, 

Mae Erankie Johnson, Barbara Ann Hardy 

The J. L. Winningham Scholarship Award of $50.00 
Chancy Sherrill, Jr. 

Highest Academic Records 

Sarnie R. Grier 

11 


James H. Davis 


Eddie L. Rivers 


Academic Scholarships 


Hazel Bailey 
Viola Caldwell 
Doris Cathcart 


Calvin Harris 
Eddie Rivers 
Delores Witherspoon 
Luddie Woodard 


General 

Wilson Brodie 
joan Crawford 
Loretta Crowder 
Willie Mae Davis 
Dorothy Dawkins 
Jerome Gentry 
Lellar Kirkpatrick 


Scholarships 

Willie Mae Lindsay 
Rachel Millsap 
Mary Rouse 
Vernell Sadler 
Dorothy Seigle 
David Thompson 
Willie Mae Welch 


SUPERIOR WORK IN ACADEMIC DEPARTMENTS 
College Department 

Business Administration James E. Davis 

Business Education Sarnie L. Grier 

English James H. Davis 

French Willie Whitworth, James E. Davis 

German James H. Davis 

Humanities Norris Smith 

Mathematics Julius Cousar 

Natural Sciences Julius Cousar 

Psychology and Education James H. Daws, Willie Whitworth 

Religious Education William Johnson 

Secretarial Science— Shorthand Eddie Lee Rivers 

Mae Frankie Johnson, Barbara Ann Hardy 

Secretarial Science— Typewriting Loretta Crowder 

Social Studies Dorothv Seigle 


High School Department 

Highest Academic Record 

English 

Health 

Mathematics 

Social Studies 

Typewriting 


. . Fred Alexander 
. . Cicero A. Grier 
. Elizabeth George 
. . Fred Alexander 
. . Emma Gowngton 
Richard Thomas 


SPECIAL AWARDS 
Athletics 


Basketball Loretta Grow'der, Thelmore Erwin 

Calvin Harris, Bessie Dargins 

Track Bobby L. Stevenson, Thomas Sowell 

Auto Mechanics Oscar Hammond 

Tailoring Roosevelt Huey 


12 


1958-1959 Carver College Honor Society 


(Membership requires 23 average and not less than 45 quarter hours.) 


James E. Davis 
James H. Davis 
Sarnie R. Grier 
Barbara Hardy 
William Holman 
Mae Frankie Johnson 


William Johnson 
Eddie Rivers 
Norris Smith 
Rosetta Watkins 
Willie Whitworth 


COMMITTEES OF THE FACULTY 

ADMINISTRATIVE 

Dr. E. H. Brown, Chairman 
Mr. J. F. Alexander Mrs. D. R. Crawford 

Mr. B. L. Brown Mrs. M. P. Spivey 


ADMISSIONS 

Mr. J. F. Alexander, Chairman 
Mr. B. L. Brown Miss J. A. Pharr 


ALUMNI 

Mrs. D. R. Crawford, Chairman 
Mrs. L. M. Booton Mr. R. P. Rorie 

Mr. J. F. Towns 

COMMENCEMENT 

Mr. R. P. Rorie, Chairman 

Mr. Nigel M. Ayton Mrs. M. S. McCaskill 

Mrs. M. C. Hughes Mrs. M. P. Spivey 


COUNSELING 

Miss Evelyn Willis, Chairman 
Mr. B. L. Brown Miss J. A. Pharr 


CURRICULUM AND CATALOG 


Miss P. E. Perry, Chairman 
Mr. J. F. Alexander Mrs. L. M. Booton 

Mr. Nigel M. Ayton Mrs. M. P. Spivey 


FRESHMAN ORIENTATION 

Mr. Nigel M. Ayton, Chairman 
Mrs. M. L. McKinney Miss Evelyn Willis 

Mrs. I. T. Yongue 

13 


HONOR SOCIETY 

Mr. H. L. Counts, Chairman 
Miss P. E. Perry Miss J. A. Pharr 


IN-SERVICE TEACHER TRAINING 

Miss Evelyn Willis, Chairman 
Mr. J. F. Alexander Mrs. D. R. Crawford 

Mr. Robert Carter Miss J. A. Pharr 

INSTITUTES AND COMMUNITY-SERVICE PROJECTS 

Mr. Robert Carter, Chairman 
Mrs. L. M. Booton Mrs. M. C. Flughes 

Mr. B. L. Brown Mr. L. E. Levi 


LIBRARY 

Mrs. D. R. Crawford, Chairman 
Mr. Nigel Ayton Miss P. E. Perry 

Mrs. M. L. McKinney Miss Evelyn Willis 

PROGRAMS AND SOCIAL ACTIVITIES 

Miss J. A. Pbarr, Chairman 

Mrs. D. R. Crawford Dr. Thomas Watkins, Jr. 

PUBLIC RELATIONS 

Mr. B. L. Brown, Chairman 
Mr. Robert Carter Mrs. M. C. Hughes 

Mrs. M. L. McKinney 

PUBLICATIONS 
(Newspaper and Annual) 

Mrs. M. L. McKinney, Chairman 
Mr. Robert Carter Miss P. E. Perry 

Mr. H. L. Counts Mr. J. F. Towns 

Mrs. M. C. Hughes Miss Evelyn Willis 

Mrs. I. T. Yongue 

SCHOLARSHIPS AND AWARDS 

Mrs. L. M. Booton, Chairman 
Miss ]. A. Pharr Miss Eveljui Willis 

STUDENT GOVERNMENT 

Mr. B. L. Brown, Chairman 
Mrs. D. R. Crawford Miss J. A. Pharr 


TEACHER WELFARE 

Mrs. D. R. Crawford, Chairman 
Miss J. A. Phan- Mrs. M. P. Spivey 


14 


GENERAL INFORMATION 


Objectives of the College 

Believing in the dignity and worth of every person and in equal op- 
portunity for the development of individual capacity, Carver College de- 
sires to serve the individual and the community by offering to young 
people and adults educational experiences for enriched living, cultural 
development, and responsible citizenship. Its major aim is to provide for 
young people a well-balanced general education program which will pre- 
pare them in specific requirements for junior standing in a senior college 
or university, for entrance to a professional school, and for the completion 
of the Associate in Arts degree. The adult program is designed for con- 
tinued development in the fields of vocational, cultural, and general 
education. 

More specifically the basic objectives are: 

1. To develop competency for further academic or pre-professional 
study as a prerequisite to major fields in a four-year college or uni- 
versity. Thus the student who wishes to complete a four-year 
college course or prepare for a profession requiring more than two 
years may complete the first two years at Carver College. 

2. Preparation in vocational education. The college offers one and 
two-year programs to meet the vocational needs of young people 
who wish to terminate training at the end of one or two years. 
These programs are in the fields of Ceneral Business, Business 
Administration, and Secretarial Science. 

3. Preparation in the field of adult education. The college seeks to 
make available to adults educational and training opportunities 
for the purpose of increasing their occupational competency and 
personal growth. These offerings are in organized vocational, cul- 
tural, and general education courses. 

Location 

Carver College is located in the city of Charlotte in Mecklenburg 
County, North Carolina. With an estimated population of 166,000, Char- 
lotte is the largest city in the two Carolinas and serves as the center of 
commerce, industry, and culture for an area of twenty-four counties. 

Classes are held in the Second Ward High School Building at 501 
South Alexander Street, less than a mile from the center of the city. The 
Carver College Office is located on the main floor of the building, and 
is open from 10:00 A.M. to 10:00 P.M. 

Library Facilities 

The Carver College Library is situated on the main floor of the new 
building. The library contains approximately 4,000 volumes and has 
at its disposal more than 70 periodicals. After two o’clock college students 
have access to this library and are encouraged to use the books of college 

15 


level. The facilities of the Second Ward High School Library and the 
Charlotte Public Library are also available to students. The college is at 
present working toward a minimum goal of 6,000 volumes for its library 
by the end of this school term. 

A trained Librarian with assistants has charge of the library. 


Counseling and Guidance 

The instructional program of Carver College contributes to the guid- 
ance process by furnishing try-out experiences under the direction of 
interested faculty members, wherever this is possible. Students are en- 
couraged to consult with their instructors regarding problems which they 
encounter. During the pre-registration and registration periods, the faculty 
serves in an advisory capacity for the planning of programs of study and 
the scheduling of classes. Two part-time counselors add to the efficiency 
of this program. 

Each student, upon entering the college, is assigned to one of the 
teachers who acts as advisor. Frequent conferences are held during each 
quarter. This close contact between faculty and students lends to a 
carefully guided Junior College career. 


Accreditation 

Carver College is a member of the North Carolina College Confer- 
ence, is affiliated with the American Association of Junior Colleges, and 
is accredited by the North Carolina State Department of Education. 

The college is working closely with officials of the Southern Associa- 
tion of Colleges and Secondary Schools for accreditation in the near future 

Credits earned at Carver College in curricula leading to degrees are 
transferable to senior colleges and universities. 

Veterans' Education 

Carver College trains veterans under the G. I. Bill of Rights. Veterans 
seeking training under the provisions of Public Law 16 or 894 (Federal 
Educational Rehabilitation Program), Public Law 346 (Servicemen’s Re- 
adjustment Act), or Public Law 550 (Veterans’ Readjustment Assistance 
Act of 1952) must enroll for a minimum of twelve quarter hours in order 
to receive full subsistence. Routines involving letters of eligibility, inter- 
ruption of training, and the like are handled by the College Office. Tech- 
nical questions relating to the Veterans Administration are referred to Mr. 
Vernon O. Tucker, Veterans’ Service Officer who is located at 123 North 
Poplar Street, and Mr. John L. Little, Officer in charge of Veterans 
Administration of Charlotte, North Carolina, 127 West 7th Street. 

Before the time of registration, each veteran who wishes to enter 
Carver College should do the following: 

1. File at the college office the following: 

(a) Application for admission completely filled out. 

16 


(b) Transcripts of all previous high school and/or college courses 
completed before or after induction or as a part of Army or 
Navy basic training or specialized training programs; also, 
records of courses taken by correspondence through the United 
States Armed Forces Institute. The latter records may be se- 
cured from United States Armed Forces Institute, Madison, 
Wisconsin. All transcripts and records should be sent directly 
from the school, college, or other agencies to Carver College. 

2. Report to the College Office to receive definite instructions for 
making application for a Certificate of Eligibility and Entitlement, 
or if the veteran has interrupted his previous training in another 
institution, for a Supplemental Certificate of Eligibility. 

At the time of registration the veteran should submit to the College 
Office a Certificate of Eligibility and Entitlement or a Supplemental Cer- 
tificate of Eligibility. 

Veterans in G. I Bill training under Public Law 550 will receive a 
monthly educational and training allowance from the Government to help 
meet the expenses of their training and Imng expenses. Tuition, books, 
supplies, and other incidentals fees are the personal responsibility of the 
veteran. A veteran will get his monthly allowance some time after the 
end of each month of training completed. Before the Veterans Adminis- 
tration can pay him, the law requires a certificate from both the veteran 
and his school or training establishment in which he was enrolled and pur- 
suing his course during that period. 

A veteran attending Carver College is required to maintain satisfactory 
academic achievement, attendance, and conduct. 

Education for Vocationally Handicapped 

Men and women who have suffered a disability which renders them 
vocationally handicapped or which might be expected to render them vo- 
cationally handicapped are eligible for services of the Division of Vocation- 
al Rehabilitation. These services include vocational counseling and guid- 
ance, medical treatment, training (payment of costs such as books, fees, 
tuition), and placement. These services are available at no cost to the in- 
dividual, and may be secured upon application to the North Carolina State 
Vocational Rehabilitation office at 127 West Seventh Street, telephone 
FR 5-8686, Mr. C. A. McDaniel, Director. 

Employment Service 

In cooperation with the North Carolina Employment Serivce, the 
college offers employment service to assist students in securing part-time 
or full-time employment. Special attention will be given to placement of 
students who satisfactorily complete the requirements for graduation in 
the terminal curricula. Application should be made in person at the College 
Office and at the North Carolina Divisional Employment Office located 
at 426 South Tryon Street, telephone ED 4-6431. 

Students proficient in the Secretarial Science Terminal Program are 
in demand and are usually placed immediately in local businesses and 
educational institutions as secretaries. 


17 


GENERAL REGULATIONS 


Application for Admission 

Application for admission is made by submitting C 1 ) a completed official 
application form, (2) official transcript of high school record showing 
16 acceptable units, (3) statement of recommendation from high school 
principal, (4) statement of recommendation for transfer students from last 
college attended. 

For admission as an advanced student, application is made by sub- 
mitting (1) a completed official application form, (2) official transcript 
of all former college work. An applicant who has attended other insti- 
tutions of collegiate grade must not disregard his collegiate record in 
making an application to this institution. 

Transcripts delivered in person by the applicant are unofficial. Only 
transcripts received directly from other institutions are considered official. 

In short or refresher courses, students may register without transcripts 
or entrance classification examinations. 

Placement Examinations 

The English and Mathematics placement examinations and the college 
aptitude tests must be taken by all entering students. The results from 
this testing program will enable the student and the college to plan a 
program which the entrant can carry successfully. 

Registration 

Registration for credit in any course is limited to the first five days 
of the quarter. 

Under the quarter system, three courses (not less than 12 quarter 
hours) constitute a full college load; however, a student may register for 
less work. For students who maintain “B” averages, special permission may 
be obtained from the Director to take an additional course. 

Veterans must register for either a full load (12 to 15 quarter hours) 
or a half load (not less than 10 quarter hours) to receive subsistence. 

Change of Name or Address 

Students are urged to notify the Registrar’s office promptly in writing 
when they change their names or addresses. 

Change of Program 

During the first week of a quarter a student may change his program 
with permission from the Director and the Registrar. Dropping a course 
without proper permission will result in a grade of “F.” 

Examinations 

Final examinations on the entire quarter’s work are given at the close 
of each quarter in each class. Students are required to take the scheduled 
final examinations at the appointed time and place in order to secure credit. 

18 


Probation 


Students are placed on probation because of unsatisfactory grades, ex- 
cessive absences or poor citizenship. 

Failure to pass at least tAvo-thirds of the units carried during any quarter 
places a student on scholastic probation under the following conditions: 

1. It is necessary for a student to see a counselor before school opens 
to have a program of studies approved. 

2. No unexcused absences in excess of 3 may be incurred in any class. 

3. A passing grade average must be maintained in all units attempted. 

4. Special permission must be obtained from the counselor for par- 
ticipation in any extra-curricular activity. This includes athletic com- 
petition, social organizations, service or interest clubs, publications 
and student government. 

These conditions may also be applied to those probationary cases with 
excessive absences or poor citizenship. 

To remove probation, it is necessary to do satisfactory work in the total 
program attempted during the quarter for which the student is currently 
registered. 

If the above requirements are not fulfilled, the student is dropped. 


Scholarships and Grades 

Students are notified of deficiencies in scholarship upon completion 
of mid-term examinations. 

Final quarter grades are available to students within four weeks of the 
end of the quarter. 

The system of grades and grade points at Carrier College is as follows: 

A— indicates work of superior character. 

B— indicates work of a better than ar^erage grade. 

C— indicates average work. 

D— indicates less than average, but passing. 

F— indicates failing; student must repeat course if credit is 
desired 

I— some phase of work incomplete at time grades were re- 
ported. Incompletes must be made up not later than the 
succeding quarter after work was originally due; other- 
wise, the “I” automatically becomes “F.” 

\VP— permission granted to withdraw, but passing at time of 
withdrawal. 

WF— permission granted to udthdraw, but failing at time of 
wathdrawal. 

A Student who withdraws from a course without permission automatically 
receives an "F” in that course. 


A quarter credit is the same as a quarter hour. For each hour of credit, 
letters carry the following values: 

A— 3 quality points F— 0 quality point 

B— 2 quality points I— 0 quality point 

C— 1 quality point WP— 0 quality point 

D— 0 quality point WF— 0 quality point 


19 


Work is considered satisfactorily when a student maintains an average 
of “C” or higher; that is, the number of quality points earned equals or 
surpasses the number of quarter hour credits pursued. 

Attendance Requirements 

Regular class attendance is required in all classes for which the stu- 
dent is registered. Each student may be allowed three cuts from each 
class during the quarter, but after the third absence he may be suspended 
by the Director. Absences due to illness must be accounted for in the Di- 
rector’s Office. Students who are absent for acceptable reasons may have 
absences excused through the Director’s Office. 

A student who has been absent from classes on account of prolonged 
or repeated illness or other emergencies and a student on scholastic pro- 
bation forfeits the cuts which he might otherwise have been allowed. 

Transfer of College Credits 

Students who plan to transfer to a four-year college or university upon 
completion of their junior college work should inform their advisers 
when they enroll so that the loss of credit may be avoided. 

Medical Care 

Minor medical care is provided. This includes only minor remedies 
and materials that can care for first aid and minor illnesses. Should serious 
illnesses occur during the school day, students are referred to the school 
physician or taken to Good Samaritan Hospital. The fees incurred in such 
cases must be met by the individual student. 

All students are encouraged to participate in the accident insurance 
program of the school. 


Expenses 


Tuition: 

a. The tuition fee for a resident of North Carolina is four dollars 
($4.00) per quarter hour credit or the equivalent in hours of instruc- 
tion. Therefore, a student who enrolls for the normal load of three 
courses, each carrying five quarter hours credit, wall be charged 
twenty dollars ($20.00) per course or sixty dollars ($60.00) for three 
courses for the quarter. 

b. The tuition fee is eight dollars ($8.00) per quarter hour credit for 
non-residents of North Carolina. Students whose supporting parents 
(or guardians) have not been a bona fide resident of the State of 
North Carolina for more than six months immediately preceding the 
day of his first enrollment in the institution shall be termed an out- 
of-state student with the following exceptions: 

(1) A student over twenty-one years of age at the time of his first 
matriculation who has resided in North Carolina for more than 
one year other than by virtue of attendance at another college 
or temporarv^ military assignment, preceding the day of his first 
enrollment. 


(2) A student whose supporting parent is a regular employee of the 
Federal Government stationed in the state of North Carohna. 


20 


(3) A student whose supporting parent is a regular employee of the 
Federal Government who is employed outside of the state, but 
who through law is permitted to retain his North Carolina 
citizenship. 

The furnishing of incomplete or incorrect information regarding res- 
idence may result in the student’s dismissal from college. The Registrar’s 
Office determines each student’s residential status on the basis of existing 
information and interpretation of regulations. 

Registration: 

A registration fee of five dollars ($5.00) will be charged each quarter. 
An activity fee of four dollars ($4.00) will be charged each quarter. 


TOTAL EXPENSES FOR RESIDENTS OF NORTH CAROLINA 

FULL-TIME STUDENTS PER QUARTER (3 Courses): 


Tuition ($4.00 per quarter hour credit) $ 60.00 

Registration Fee 5.00 

Student Activity Fee 4.00 


Total $ 69.00 

PART-TIME STUDENTS 
Two Courses: 

Tuition ($4.00 per quarter hour credit) $ 40.00 

Registration Fee 5.00 

Student Activity Fee 4.00 


$ 49.00 

One Course: 

Tuition ($4.00 per quarter hour) $ 20.00 

Registration Fee 5.00 


$ 25.00 

SPECIAL FEES 

Science 151, Survey of Biological 5.00 

Science 152, Survey of Physical 5.00 

Science 153, General Botany 5.00 

Science 154, General Zoology 5.00 

Science 155, Anatomy and Physiology 5.00 

Science 251, 252, 253, General Inorganic Chemistry 5.00 

Science 254, 255, 256 , General Physics 5.00 

Business 155, 156, 255, 256, Typewriting 2.00 

Business 257, Office Machines 2.00 

Yearbook Fee 6.00 

Picture Fee 1.00 

Insurance Fee (Recommended) 1.25 

Graduation Fee (Minimum) 6.00 

Late Registration Fee 5.00 

Transcript Fee (after issuance of first copy) 1.00 

21 


Books ajmd Supplies: 

The cost of books and supplies is estimated at approximately tvi'enty- 
five dollars ($25.00) per quarter. 

All charges for tuition and other fees are due and payable on the day 
of registration. Checks and money orders should be made payable to Carver 
College. 


Refunds: 

Periods of Actual Attendance Percent of Tuition 

Counted from Day of Registration and Fees Refunded 

One week or less (1 to 7 days) 80% 

Between 1 and 2 weeks (8 to 14 days) 60% 

Between 2 and 3 weeks ( 15 to 21 days) 40% 

Between 3 and 4 weeks (22 to 28 days) 20% 

Over 4 weeks (29 days or over) 0% 

The registration fee is not refundable. 


it is the policy of the college to follow the law as stated in Public 
Law 550 in case of unused portions of tuitional fees and other charges 
to veterans. 


DAYTIME CLASSES 

Daytime classes will be added upon sufficient demand and enrollment. 

SPECIAL STUDENTS 

Persons of mature age and of good character may enter the College 
for the purpose of taking courses wathout becoming candidates for a degree. 
Such persons will be listed as unclassified students. They must prove to 
their instructors their ability to pursue successfully the courses for which 
they have registered. Tlrese students are subject to the same rules and 
regulations as regular students. 

SCHEDULE OF CLASSES 

Classes are scheduled to meet Monday through Friday from five until 
ten o’clock in the et'ening. Each class period is fifty minutes in length. 

WITHDRAWAL 

Students who find it impossible to continue their assigned classes at 
the College should make written application for withdrawal in the Direc- 
tor’s Office. Such application wall be reriewed and approved by the Director 
before permission is granted. Any student who leaves the college, except 
after the close of a quarter, wdthout notifying the Office, Mil receive a 
mark of “F” in all courses. 


HONOR ROLL 

A student must take a full load of three subjects, fifteen quarter hours 
of work, and maintain at least a “B” average to qualify for the Honor Roll. 


22 


GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS 

Graduation requirements at Car\'er College vary according to the oc- 
cupational field the student has selected. Upon the satisfactory completion 
of any of the prescribed courses listed in the following pages, a student is 
awarded a diploma or the degree of “Associate in Arts.” 

Each candidate for the Associate in Arts degree is required to file an 
application for graduation in the Director’s Office. The initiative for filing 
this application is delegated to the student. The application should be filed 
at the time the student registers for the third quarter. 

Each candidate for the Associate in Arts degree must present at least 
90 quarter hours and 90 grade points. He must have made a general 
average of “C” or more in all of his work. He must have fulfilled to the 
satisfaction of the faculty all the requirements of the curricula of the 
junior college division. He must have been a student in the College during 
his sophomore year and hav^e completed in residence at least 45 of the 90 
hours required for the degree. 

Whereas a minimum number of quarter hours and grade points is 
set and determine the worthiness of each individual candidate for a degree, 
based on an objective requirement for a degree, the College reserves the 
right to require character and personal integrity as well as academic 
proficiency. 


STUDENT ACTIVITIES 

The development of the whole individual is the aim of the insti- 
tution. Outside of the classroom, certain activities, designated as extra- 
curricular, are provided. The extracurricular program of the college con- 
tributes greatly to the cultural and intellectual development of the stu- 
dents. Many enriching experiences are provided through the close cooper- 
ation which is maintained between the administration and other civic and 
educational institutions of the city and nearby areas. 

Student Government 

It is the policy of Carver College to encourage and develop student 
self-government. Student government was organized the first quarter of 
1949 at Carver and is continuing to function. The Student Council’s 
functions are to serve the membership of the school in every possible way, 
forming certain committees vital to the student government program, pro- 
moting educational projects, and formulating, with the administration’s ap- 
proval, certain school policies. 


Dramatics 

The Carver Stage Grafters attempt to stimulate interest in all phases 
of dramatic expression. Plans for expansion of the drama program of the 
college are being formulated to include group discussions of pantomime, 
acting, make-up, playwriting, radio technique, and verse choirs. Emphasis 
is placed on the special training of individual students and the exchange 
of ideas in the field of dramatic art. The nucleus of the Stage Grafters 
is the class in speech. 


23 


Newspaper 

To provide information for all persons interested in Carver College, 
The Carver Chronicle, official voice of the students, is published once 
each quarter. 

The duties and purposes of the newspaper are : to create a wholesome 
school spirit; to support the best traditions of the institution; to encourage 
worthy school activities; to record the history of the school; to offer training 
in journalistic projects; and, above all, to afford a free and usage forum for 
expression and opinions in the tradition of our democracy. 

College Yearbook — The Carveran 

The first Yearbook was published at the end of Carver’s initial year in 
1950 and henceforth is an annual publication. The purpose of the Carver 
Yearbook is to present a vivid account of the activities of the institution 
during the school year. 


Athletics 

Carver College’s athletic program is limited to basketball and field 
events. Opportunity for other athletic activities will be added as interest, 
time, and enrollment indicate the need. 

Recreation 

Social activities, including dances, receptions, banquets, and coffee 
hours, are provided as leisure interests during the school year. 

Honor Society 

In September of 1951, the Honor Society was organized. To become 
a member of the Carver College Honor Society, a student must have made 
an average of “B” or above in at least forty-five quarter hours’ work at 
Carver College. 

To be eligible for active membership in the Honor Society, a student 
shall be registered and in good standing at Carver College. He shall be of 
sophomore classification and shall have earned a minimum of 45 quarter 
hours of credit toward an Associate in Arts degree at Carver College. His 
scholarship standing in terms of the grade or honor point average shall 
be not less than 2.3, expressed under the system A equals 3; B equals 2; C 
equals 1; D equals 0. This average shall be computed by dividing the 
number of grade or honor points by the number of credit hours. 

Music 

The Carver College Music Department (choral work) is open to all 
students after being qualified through vocal tests and may be used as an 
elective with credit. No credit will be allowed, however, for less than one 
quarter’s work. All interested students are required to pursue two years’ 
work in the department before being considered for awards or scholarships. 
All material to be covered will be planned by the music faculty after 
thorough consideration of the college talents, students’ needs, and pubhc 

24 


perfoiTnances. Choral training in the classes will be supplemented by ex- 
periences in performance at school programs and community affairs. Stu- 
dents should show evidence of doing college level work at all times. Stu- 
dents may exemplify this talent and interest through membership in the 
college chorus, male chorus, women’s chorus, mixed quartet, mixed octet, 
and male quartet. 

Attendance 

Students enrolled in music for the quarter are expected to be present 
and prompt unless officially excused. All music students are required to at- 
tend all musical events during the quarter. 

Outside Performance 

These appearances will be screened by the Director of the College 
and music faculty, thus eradicating numerous commitments on students. 

SCHOLARSHIPS 

The Scholarship Committee, consisting of interested local citizens, 
works to provide funds for worthy students for each current year. The 
faculty works jointly with this committee by sponsoring a benefit concert 
annually, the proceeds of which are added to our scholarship fund. Only 
students who are enrolled in the college and have secured at least 15 
quarter hours are eligible for these funds. 

Through the years the College has received applications from stu- 
dents who have shown a definite need for financial assistance in meeting 
their college expenses. For such needy students who also possess the ability 
to carry on their study satisfactorily, certain scholarships are available. 

NATIONAL DEFENSE STUDENT LOAN PROGRAM 

Carver College qualified for the National Defense Student Loan 
which was set up in 1958-1959 by the Department of Health, Education 
and Welfare in Washington, D. C. Its purpose is to stimulate and assist 
in the establishment at institutions of higher education of funds for the 
making of low-interest loans to students in need thereof to pursue their 
courses of study in such institutions. $5,903.22 is available for students at 
Carver College during this school term. Students with high scholarship 
and who are in need of funds should make application to the special com- 
mittee of the faculty in charge of this program. 

PROGRAMS OF STUDY 

The programs of study contained in the following pages are classified 
as “University Parallel’’ or “Terminal.” Those in the former category are 
intended for students who plan to transfer to a university or a senior col- 
lege after completion of lower division work at Carver College. Those in 
the second category are intended for students who do not plan to transfer 
to a university or a senior college after completion of lower division work 
at Carver College, but wish to gain the best possible training in specific 
fields during two years of college, and plan to enter their chosen vocation 
upon graduation from Carver College. 

25 


University Parallel Curricula 

Any of the academic courses offered by this college, if properly se- 
lected, should be accepted for transfer to a senior institution and should 
count, without loss of credit hours, toward a bachelor’s degree. How'ever, a 
student who expects to continue his college career or to enter a profes- 
sional school after leaving junior college should consult the catalog of the 
institution he expects to attend and select his courses accordingly. Although 
the Director will gladly assist the student in choosing the courses that will 
assure junior standing in the senior institution, the final responsibility for 
selecting the proper courses must rest wath the student. 

Terminal Curricula 

It is possible for a student in the tenninal programs to do part-time 
work in his chosen field under the supervision of a trained co-ordinator 
and, at the same time, to gain credit towards graduation for this work-type 
educational experience. 


26 


CARVER COLLEGE 


Liberal Arts (University Parallel) 

FIRST YEAR 

Hours 

Required; Credit 

English 151-152 10 

Mathematics 151-152 or 155-156 10 

Science 151 5 

Science 152 5 

Social Science 151 5 

Required (Choose one): 

French 151-152 . 10 

German 151-152 10 

Electives: 

Physical Education 121-122, 123-124 4 

Religious Education 131-132 4 

Science 153, 154, and 155 5 

Social Science 152 5 

SECOND YEAR 

Required: 

English 251-252 10 

Humanities 251 5 

Psychology 251 5 

Required (Choose one): 

French 251-252 10 

German 251-252 10 

Electives: 

Education 251 5 

English 231-232 6 

Physical Education 221-222 4 

Psychology 252 5 

Psychology 253 5 

Religious Education 231-232 6 

Science 251-252-253; 254-255-256; 257-258-259 15 

Social Science 251-252 10 

Social Science 253-254 10 

Social Science 255 5 

Social Science 256 5 

Four quarters in the same foreign language are required. 

27 


Business Administration 

(University ParaSlel) 


FIRST YEAR 

Hours 

Credit 

Business 151-152 10 

Business 155-156 10 

English 151-152 10 

Foreign Language (French or German) 10 

Mathematics 251-252 or 155-156 10 

Science 151 5 

Science 152 5 

SECOND YEAR 

Business 251 5 

Business 252 5 

English 253-254 10 

Foreign Language (French or German) 10 

Social Science 251-252 10 

Electives: 

English 231-232 6 

Humanities 251 5 

Physical Education 121-122, 123-124 5 

Psychology 151 5 


Business Education 
(University Parallel) 


FIRST YEAR 

Hours 

Credit 

Business 151-152 10 

Business 153-154 10 

English 151-152 10 

Mathematics 151-152 10 

Physical Education 121-122 4 

Physical Education 123-124 4 

Science 151-152 10 

Typewriting 155-156 10 

SECOND YEAR 

Business 252 5 

Economics 251-252 10 

Education 251 5 

English 251-252 10 

Psychology 251 5 

Psychology 252 5 

Psychology 253 5 


28 


Pre-Engineering (University Parallel) 

Arrangements have been made between Carver College and the 
Agricultural and Technical College of Greensboro, North Carolina, for 
a four-year co-operative program in engineering. The first two years of 
the program may be completed at Carver College and then the student 
may transfer to the Agricultural and Technical College to complete the 
final two years of the undergraduate work in the same branch of engi- 
neering provided the grades are satisfactory. 

Students who plan to transfer to other engineering schools should 
plan their program with the aid of the Director to prevent any loss of 
credit. 


Curriculum 


FIRST YEAR 

Hours 

Credit 


English 151, 152, 251 15 

Mathematics 151, 152, 351 15 

Mechanical Engineering 131, 132, 133 9 

Science 251, 252, 253 15 


SECOND YEAR 


Mathematics 352, 353, 354 15 

Science 254, 255, 256 15 

Social Science 251-252 10 

Social Science 255 5 

Approved Electives 10 


29 


Business Administration and Accounting Course 
(Terminal Curricula) 


FIRST YEAR 

Hours 

Credit 

Business 151-152 10 

Business 153-154 10 

English 151-152 10 

Mathematics 251-252 10 

SECOND YEAR 

Business 251-252 10 

English 253-254 10 

Social Science 251-252 10 

Electives 20 


These courses are merely suggested. The students may elect any other 
course offered from which he believes he may benefit. Suggested: 

Business 257-258 
English 231-232 
French or German 151-152 
Psychology 251 


Secretarial Science 

(Terminal) 

FIRST YEAR 


Hours 

Credit 

Business 153-154 10 

Business 155-156 10 

Business 259 . . 5 

English 151-152 10 

Mathematics 251-252 10 


SECOND YEAR 


Business 253-254 10 

Business 255-256 10 

Business 257-258 10 

Business 351 5 

English 253-254 10 


30 


COURSE OF INSTRUCTION 


Business 

Business 151-152: Principles of Accounting. An introductory course in 
the field of accounting. Topics covered include the theory of debits and 
the construction of the trial balance, work sheet, profit and loss statement, 
and the balance sheet. The problems and materials used are characteristic 
of the single proprietorship form of business organization. 

Business I53T54: Elementary Shorthand. A study of elementary Gregg 
shorthand principles and theory. Minimum requirements: Dictation at 
60 words a minute on new material with a transcription rate on the 
typewriter of 25 words a minute. A student having one or more years of 
shorthand may validate this course by passing an examination, provided 
he continues Business 253-254, and receives ten quarter hours credit. 

Business 155-156: Elementary^ Typewriting. The work in elementary 
typewriting includes learning the keyboard, operating the parts of the 
machine, care of the machine, writing simple letters, simple tabulation, 
continuity writing. In this course more stress is given to accuracy than 
to speed. Maximum speed: 40 words a minute with a maximum of five 
errors. A student having one or more years of typewriting may validate 
this course by passing an examination, provided he continues Business 
255-256, and receives ten hours credit. A laboratory fee of $2.00 is charged. 

Business 25 1 : Business Law'. Essentials of the law of contracts, with related 
subjects. 

Business 252: Introduction to Business. To enable the students to have 
an overall understanding of starting a business— the organization, financ- 
ing, and managing of a business, including the principles of purchasing, 
selling, record keeping, granting credit, collecting, and other functions of 
business. 

Business 253: Intermediate Shorthand and Transcription. (Prerequisite: 
Business 153-154.) Review of fundamentals, and continuation of the 
development of reading and writing, with emphasis in transcription skills. 

Business 253-254: Advanced Shorthand. The course consists of dictation 
and transcription with a thorough review of shorthand theory. Accuracy, 
speed, neatness and comprehension are developed. Intensive drill is given 
in the production of mailable transcripts. A minimum dictation rate of 
100 words a minute with a transcription rate of 35 words per minute 
must be consistently maintained with a high degree of accuracy. (Pre- 
requisite: Shorthand 153-154 or equivalent.) 

Business 255-256; Advanced Typewriting. The work includes study of 
different styles of business letters, manuscript copy, making carbon copies, 
tabulation, business reports, legal documents, effective display of typed 
matter. Minimum speed of 50 words a minute, with a maximum of five 
errors is required. A laboratory fee of $2.00 is charged. 

31 


Business 257: Office Machines. A study of the commonly used office 
machines, such as dictating machines, adding and calculating machines, 
duplicating processes, and miscellaneous equipment. (Prerequisite; Math- 
ematics 251-252.) A laboratory fee of $2.00 is charged. 

Business 258: Office Practice. An effort is made to observe and direct 
the student in developing those characteristics and personality traits which 
are desirable and essential in the business office. The main phases of study 
are office behavior, office methods and procedure. Whenever possible, 
actual office situations are created so that the student is trained not in 
theory alone, but in practice. 

Business 259: Filing. A comprehensive coverage of filing fundamentals; 
rules for alphabetical indexing, card and correspondence filing methods, 
charge and follow-up methods, and transfer methods. 

Business 351: Secretarial Accounting. This course is specifically designed 
for secretarial students. In content, organization, and emphasis, it is 
based on a survey made by the authors of actual bookkeeping and record- 
ing activities performed on the job by secretarial graduates. The activities 
consist almost entirely of special-phase recording and simple bookkeeping 
procedures. 

Business English: (See English 253-254.) 

Business Mathematics: (See Mathematics 251-252.) 

Education and Psychology 

Education 251: Introduction to Education. This course is a comprehensive 
study of the school. The course begins with a short review of the Euro- 
pean background of education and then makes an extensive study of the 
development of the theories and practices of American education. It may 
be elected by candidates for the Elementary and High School Teacher’s 
Certificate. 

Psychology 251: General Psychology. General problems of personality, 
adjustment and mental health are presented in this course. It is designed 
to meet the needs of both students who wish to continue in the field 
of psychology and those who will do no further work in the field. 

Psychology 252: Educational Psychology. A systematic presentation of the 
psychology and biological bases of growth and development, the effec- 
tive use of the emotions in learning and hehawor, the techniques in- 
volved in learning, relationships, and a study of individual differences 
and their specific implications and applications to school and classroom 
actiHties. Required of candidates for the Primary, Grammar Grade, and 
High School Teacher’s Certificate. (Prerequisite: Psycholog}' 251.) 

Psychology 253: Adolescent Psvcholog^'. A comprehensive view of the 
physical, emotional, social, moral and intellectual growth of adolescents. 
This course is designed to aid prospective teachers and adolescents in 
understanding the problems of this period of growth and development. 

32 


English 


English 151-152: English Composition. The theory and practice of cur- 
rent English grammar, with emphasis upon recognition of parts of speech, 
development of sentence structure, and use of punctuation. Written 
composition is emphasized. 

English 251-232: World Literature. A study of early Greek and Latin 
literature. The major literary contributions of the Oriental and the 
Medieval worlds and modern writings are emphasized during the second 
quarter. 

English 231-232: Fundamentals of Speech. This course enables the stu- 
dent to think and organize via the thought processes necessary to clear 
and valid speech. There is specific emphasis given to the broad types 
of speeches: to empress, to inspire, to inform, to convince, to persuade, to 
explain. Each student is required to render a certain number of these 
types of speeches. The teaching of parliamentary procedure is included 
in the course. 

English 253-254: Business English. A study of the fundamentals of gram- 
mar and specific application to business documents and other business 
papers, practical training in business writings, the editing of business 
materials, proof reading and corrections. 


Foreign Languages 

French 

French 151-152: Elementary French. This is a course designed to give 
the student a general understanding of written and spoken French. Em- 
phasis is given to pronunciation, fundamentals of grammar, vocabulary 
building, and translation from English to French. 

French 251-252: Intermediate French. This course continues stress on 
pronunciation and grammar. French readers are introduced to help students 
acquire reading skill and build broad French background. Special emphasis 
is given to vocabulary study and conversation. 

German 

German 151-152: Elementary German. This course is designed to give the 
beginning student the fundamentals of grammar and syntax together with 
easy reading exercise. A series of graded readers is used. Emphasis is on vo- 
cabulary building and the acquisition of a reading and speaking knowledge 
of German. 

German 251-252: Intermediate German. Continued stress of pronuncia- 
tion, dictation, and review of German grammar. The ability to write and 
converse in German is further developed. 

35 


Humanities 


Humanities 25 1 : Survey of Humaniries. This course is designed to ac- 
quaint the student with the intellectual, emotional, and artistic values 
of Western Civilization. Special attention is given to the examination 
of methods for criticism and evaluation of ideas. Emphasis is placed upon 
the development of an appreciation and understanding of the humanities, 
including philosophy, literature, music, architecture, sculpture, and paint- 
ing. 


Mathematics 

Mathematics 155-156: General Mathematics . This course is designed to 
give the essential mathematical background for college work other than 
in the fields of mathematics and science. The number system, statistical 
and formular graphs, solution of algebraic equations, practical geometry 
and trigonometry. 

Mathematics 151: College Algebra. Functions and their graphs, equations, 
and their solutions, systems of linear equations, determinants, exponents, 
quadratic equations, inequalities, variations, progressions, mathematical in- 
duction, binominal theorem, complex numbers, theory of equations are 
stressed. 

Mathematics 152: Plane Trigonometry. Identities, reduction and addition 
formulas, graphs, trigonometric equations, inverse trigonometric functions, 
solution of right and oblique triangles are included in the course. 

Mathematics 251 - 252 : Business Mathematics. Application of mathematics 
in typical accounting, financial, and other business problems, including 
bank discounts, trade discounts, weighted averages, merchandise markup 
and turnover, application of compound interest principles to annuity, 
sinking fund, and amortization problems are considered. 

Mathematics 351: Analytic Geometry. A thorough study of Cartesian co- 
ordinates, curves, loci, straight line, circle, polar co-ordinates and conic 
sections completes the plane analytic geometry. Co-ordinates in space, 
loci, the plane and the straight line complete the course. Prerequisite: 
Mathematics 152. 

Mathematics 352: Differential Calculus . This course includes the funda- 
mentals of differential calculus; maxima and minima; rates; curve tracing 
and application of derivatives, etc. Prerequisite: Mathematics 351. 

M athematics 353: Integral Calculus. This course consists of fundamentals 
of integral calculus, application of integrals to measurements of arcs, areas, 
and volumes, etc. Prerequisite: Mathematics 352. 

Mathematics 354: Differential and Integral Calculus . This is a contin- 
uation of differential and integral calculus. Solutions of equations, appli- 
cation of integrals, center of gravity, movement of inertia, double and 
triple integration are studied. Prerequisite: Mathematics 353. 

34 


Mechanical Engineering 


Mechanical Engineering 131, 132: Engineering Drawing. The major areas 
covered in this course include : lettering, instrument practice, geometric con- 
struction, orthographic projection, sections, auxiliary views, pictorial draw- 
ings, freehand sketching, dimensioning and sound drawing practices. Six 
laboratory hours per week. Credit: 3 quarter hours each. 

Mechanical Engineering 133: Descriptive Geometry. The objective of this 
course is to familiarize the student with the representation of geometrical 
magnitudes in order to arrive at true length, true slope and line as a point, 
edge view and true size of a plane, shortest distance between Hnes, a 
line piercing a plane, intersection of planes, dihedral angle, shortest dis- 
tance to a plane, angle between a line and a plane, revolution, develop- 
ment of surfaces, intersection of solids, mining problems, and miscella- 
neous problems. Six laboratory hours per week. Credit: 3 quarter hours. 

Mechanical Engineering 231: Engineering Dravdng. This course is an 
extension of Mechanical Engineering 161 and 162 and deals primarily 
with screw threads and bolts, gears and cams, and detailed assembly draw- 
ings of simple tools, dies, and machinery. Six laborator)' hours per week. 
Prerequisites: Mechanical Engineering 131 and 132. 

Natural Sciences 

Science 151: Survey of Biological Science. A study of the various branches 
of biology, their principles and problems, with special reference to man 
and the living emdronment as it affects him. (Offered each quarter.) 

Science 152: Survey of Physical Science. A survey of astronomy, chem- 
istry, geology and physics, giving the student a fair panoramic \dew of 
the universe in which he lives and his relation to it. Some appreciation 
of the scientific method, as well as the contributions of the physical science 
to the solution of some contemporary problems. (Offered each quarter.) 

Science 153: General Botany. This course is designed to show the rela- 
tion of plants to mankind, the development of a knowledge of the universe 
in which we live and as a phase of modern science. In the laboratory, 
the structure of plants and representatives of the plant phyla will be 
studied by comparison. 

Science 154: General Zoology. This course introduces the student to the 
study of animal life. The aim of this course is to trace the evolution of 
structure and function of animals without backbones and those animals 
with backbones. In the laboratory, representatives of invertebrate and 
vertebrate animals will be studied in ascending order by dissection and 
comparison. 

Science 155: Anatomy and Physiology. A study of the human body with 
emphasis on the circulatory system, ner\'ous system, muscles and bones. 

35 


Science 251-252-253: General Inorganic Chemistry. This course is an 
elementary presentation ot the tundamental principles of chemistry based 
upon a study of the physical and chemical properties of the metallic and 
non-metallic elements. Emphasis is placed on the scientific method. High 
school chemistry is recommended but is not a required prerequisite for 
this course. Three hours of recitations and lectures, and four hours 
of laboratory a week for three quarters. 

Science 254-255-256: General Physics. Physics 254 covers mechanics, heat 
and sound. Physics 255-Z56 covers electricity and magnetism, optics, and 
special topics. Three lecture and four laboratory hours a week for three 
quarters. All parts must be completed to receive credit. 

Science 257: Quantitative Chemical Analysi s: Prerequisite: Science 25 T 
252-253. Three hours of recitation and lectures, and six hours of laboratory 
weekly. 

Science 258 and 259: Qualitarive Chemical Analysi s. Prerequisite: 
Science 257. Two hours of lecture and recitation, and six hours of labora- 
tory weekly. 


Philosophy 

Philosophy 151: Introduction to Philosophy. The student will be led into 
the problems in the major areas in the field of philosophy. Living issues 
are stressed. Problems of space-time relativity, mind-body relationship, ma- 
terialism, idealism, and pragmatism are studied in an effort to get practical 
and useful information. 

Philosophy 152: Logic. A general survey of the basic problems of logic 
with emphasis upon formal aspects of reasoning. 

Physical Education 

Physi cal Education 123-124: Physical Practice. An activity course con- 
sisting of calisthenics, marching tactics, tumbling and stunts, group games, 
group sports. Required of all freshmen. 

P hysical Education 125-126: Gymnasium and Outdoors. This course is 
composed of a variety of activities ranging from individual exercises to 
oroup games. An assortment of instructional devices and methods are 
used to provide a fuller and more interesting program and to aid the 
student in the development of good posture, co-ordination of limbs and 
body, and the promotion of good sportsmanship. Class meets two hours a 
week. 

Physical E ducation 221-231: Personal Hygiene. Scientific information on 
nutrition, muscular exercise, sleep, bathing, reproduction and the most ad- 
vantageous utilization of time and energy. Lectures, class reports, discus- 
sions and individual conferences will be held. Required of all freshmen. 

36 


Religious Education 


Religious Education 131: Early Hebrew Religion and Life. TTie purpose 
of this course is to make a survey of early Hebrew culture with emphasis 
on its moral and spiritual growth as reflected in the early religious con- 
cepts of the Old Testament. 

Religious Education 132: Later Hebrew Religion and Life. This course 
is designed for a study of life, culture, and religious growth as reflected 
through the prophets, poets, and later Hebrew writers. 

Religious Education 231: Life and Teachings of Hsus. The world in 
which Christianity arose is studied with emphasis on the life and teach- 
ings of Jesus as seen in New Testament literature. 

Religious Education 232: Life and Letters of Paul. TThe course is or- 
ganized to give a portrayal of the Greco-Roman world and the life of 
Paul. A study of the Pauline letters is made to discover the role Paul 
played in all phases of the growth of the Christian church. 

The courses in religious educotion may be elected for credit by any 
student in the college; however, they are required of those who plan to 
enter senior church-related colleges. 

Social Sciences 

Social Science 151: Survey of Social Sciences. A surv^ey of the develop- 
ment of Eastern Civilization with considerable time given to a study 
of the part which biological, psychological and geographic factors have 
played in human society. Consideration is also given to the composition 
and distribution of populations. 

Social Science 132: Principles of Geography. An introductory course 
in the field of geography dealing with the earth and its planetary rela- 
tions, map representations, climate and climate elements, land forms, 
soils and man’s relation to his physical enwronment. 

Social Science 251-252: Principles of Economics. This course gives spe- 
cial attention to the economic principles, policies and problems. Business 
organizations, monetary and banking problems and characteristics of the 
economic system are among the topics included. 

Social Science 253-254: American History. (First part to 1865, latter 
part from 1865.) This course covers the discovery, colonization and re- 
sulting growth of the American nation. The evolution of American ideals 
and policies receive clear and interesting treatment. 

Social Science 255: American Government. This course is designed to 
introduce the student to political aspects of society, to provide training 
in the analysis of political problems, to equip students for the exercise 
of their duties as citizens, and to prepare students for more advanced 
training preparatory to careers in government, research, teaching, or 
private enterprise where a knowledge of domestic politics and foreign 

37 


affairs is in demand. Considerable time is given to the development of 
the Constitution, political theory, and political institutions in the United 
States. 


Social Science 256: Principles of Sociology. This is an introduction of the 
study of society, providing essentials for an intelligent understanding of 
the forces making for group life and for specialized study of sociological 
problems. 

Adult Education 

Basic Educatioi't 

This course is designed to allow adults the opportunity to finish their 
elementary education, grades 1-8, by attending evening classes which are 
held on Monday through Friday. 

Each adult is placed at his grade level and tests are given periodically 
to measure the progress of the student. As rapidly as the work of the stu- 
dent’s current grade level is satisfactoi-ily completed, he is advanced to 
the next grade. 


Course of Study 

Grade 1— Reading, Writing 
Grade 2— Reading, Writing, Spelling 
Grade 3— Reading, Writing, Spelling, Arithmetic 
Writing, 

Writing, 


Spelling, Arithmetic, Gomposition 
Spelling, Arithmetic, Gomposition, Social 


Grade 4— Reading, 

Grade 5— Reading, 

Studies 

Grade 6— Reading, Writing Spelling, Arithmetic, Gomposition, Social 
Studies, Science, Grammar 

Grade 7— Reading, Writing, Spelling, Gomposition, Grammar, Arithmetic, 
Social Studies, Science 

Grade 8— Reading, Writing, Spelling, Gomposition, Grammar, Arithmetic, 
Social Studies, Science 


Adult Education 121: Auto Mechanics. A general course designed to 
acquaint the layman or car owner with his automobile. This course is 
not designed to produce a finished mechanic but to give instruction in 
the theory, operation, and maintenance of the automobile so that car 
owners will become better informed. 


Adult Education 123, 124, 125: Dressmaking. A laboratory course deal- 
ing with fundamental problems of clothing construction including the 
use of the commercial pattern and selection, choosing the right clothes 
and fabrics, sewing tools and how to make them work for you, dress- 
making, restyling, remodeling, and remaking. Gonsideration will be given 
to attractive clothing on a limited budget. 

Adult Education 134: Play Production. The course is designed for those 
in the community interested in play production. It will be helpful to 
church and civic groups w'ho are interested in acting and directing. The 
group will put on a play at the end of the course. It may be taken for 
or without credit. 


38 


Adult Education 135: Tailoring. A laboratory course dealing with the 
fundamental problems of tailoring, including the use of commercial pat- 
terns, selections of fabrics, care and use of tools and machines. 

Adult Education 136: Tailoring. A continuation of Tailoring 135 offering 
instruction in pattern drafting for women’s and men’s clothing, remodel- 
ing, and renovation of clothing, simple fittings and alterations. Pre- 
requisite: Adult Education 135— Tailoring. 

Adult Education 137: Tailoring. Advanced study of clothing, tailoring, 
remodeling and designing, making a tailored garment, advance problems 
in the designing of patterns and styles as applied to specific types of 
garments. 

Adult Education 138: Typewriting. A non-credit course in elementary 
typewriting designed to develop correct writing techniques and practical 
skills for personal and mental typewriting techniques. A minimum typing 
speed of at least 25 words per minute is expected. 

Adult Education 139: Typewriting. A continuation of Adult Education 
138 offering instruction in letter placement, tabulation, carbon copies, 
stencils, term papers, and manuscripts, in addition to further development 
of speed and a review of typing techniques. A minimum typing speed 
of at least 45 words per minute is expected. 

Adult Education 500: Business Management Institute. A non-credit course 
designed to help students become proficient in the management of a small 
business. The class meets one night each week for six weeks. 


39 


SECOND WARD ACCELERATED HIGH SCHOOL 


General Information 

This is a high school unit under the direction of Carver College and 
is, as its name states, accelerated. This means that a student is able to make 
a grade in one semester provided he takes a full load. The school begins 
with the ninth grade. Students entering in the ninth grade should have 
records showing that they have completed the eighth grade. Any student 
who has not earned eighth grade credits eleswhere may take an achieve- 
ment test for placement. This test is administered by the staff under 
the direction of the director of tests, measurement, and research of the 
Charlotte City Schools. Students entering the tenth, eleventh and twelfth 
grades must have transcripts of all previous high school work. Complete 
requirements for graduation can be met in eighteen months instead of 
thirty-six. For each academic course offered a student may earn one unit 
per semester and for each trade offered he may earn two units per semester. 
At this rate a student may easily earn the state requirement of sixteen 
units in the eighteen months. This school is accredited by the North 
Carolina Board of Education. 


Classes 

Students may enroll for either the academic or combination academic- 
trade course. Each academic class meets daily Monday through Friday 
except on holidays established by the school. Each trade class meets for a 
two-hour or three-hour period daily Monday through Eriday except holi- 
days established by the school. 


Full-Time Students 

A full-time student may take as many as five academic courses, or four 
academic courses and one supervised study, or three academic courses and 
a trade each semester. 


Part-Time Students 

A part-time student may take four or less academic courses per semes- 
ter depending on his needs. In the case of veterans, however, to receive 
veterans’ aid as part-time, he must attend classes at least three hours per 
day, five days per week. 


40 


HIGH SCHOOL COURSE OF STUDY 


Requirements for Graduation 

For graduation from The Second Ward Accelerated High School 
of Carver College, sixteen units, grades nine to twelve, as follows are 


required: 

English 4 

Mathematics 1 

Science (including Biology) 2 

Social Studies (including U. S. History) , . 2 

Physical and Health Education 1 

Electives 6 


Second Ward Accelerated High School provides the following: Eng- 
lish, 4 units; Mathematics, 3 units; Science, 4 units; Social Studies includ- 
ing Geography, 5 units; Physical and Health Education, 1 unit; and 
Foreign Language, 2 units. 


Grade Required 

9th English I 
Civics 

General Science 
High School Arithmetic 
Physical and Health 
Education 

10th English II 

Biology 
Elective 
Elective 

11th English III 

United States History 

Elective 

Elective 

12th English IV 

Elective 
Elective 
Elective 


Electives 

ENGLISH 
Reading (Remedial) 

Social Studies 
World History 
Sociology 
Economics 
Family Relations 

1 Science 

1 Chemistry 

1 Geography 

Foreign Languages 
^ French I and II 

1 Mathematics 

1 Algebra I and II 

General Mathematics 
1 Plane Geometry 

I Gommercial 

Business Mathematics 
Typewriting II and II 

Vocational Education 
Auto Mechanics 
Brick Masonry 
Garpentry 
Clothing 

Commercial Cooking 
Foods 

Shoe Repairing 
Tailoring 


VETERANS ARE NOT REQUIRED TO TAKE 
THE COURSE IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION 
AND HEALTH. 


Course of Study 
Credit 

1 
1 


41 


SECOND WARD ACCELERATED HIGH SCHOOL 
OF CARVER COLLEGE 


Description of Courses 

Algebra 1: Statistical graphs, formulas, simple equations, nominals, poly- 
nominals, parentheses, signed numbers. 

Algebra II: A continuation of the first course in algebra plus equations 
of the first degree with two unknowns, products and factoring, quadratic 
equations, algebraic fractions, fractional equations, indirect measurement, 
square root, radicals and exponents. 

Basic Reoding Skills. 

Elective: A comprehensive development program in the basic reading 
and interpretative skills essential to progress in the high school literature 
course. The course provides a review of essential skills, and material for re- 
teaching and consolidating those skills. 

Biology: This course is designed to serve as an introduction to the entire 
field of general zoology and botany wath emphasis on the sequence of de- 
velopment of organic life on earth and its relationship to man. 

Business Arithmetic: This course is designed to prepare the student to 
deal with problems of savings and investments, wage rates, commodity 
prices, production costs, home ownership, travel and transportation, taxes 
and measurements. 

Civics: The aim of the course is to establish sound ideas about our demo- 
cratic form of government; first, as this government is applied nationally; 
second, as it serves the states and local communities. The course considers 
how the good citizen should act and think vwth reference to others who 
share his community. 

Economics: The basic principles of economics and the practices of business 
are being considered in the discussions of specific problems encountered 
by consumers. Emphasis is placed upon the application of an economic 
principle to the solution of a consumer problem rather than upon the theory. 

English I: This course has as its purpose to begin the mastery of the 
fundamentals of grammar, the parts of speech, and spelling. Writing re- 
quirement is at least one form of composition per week— paragraph, busi- 
ness or social letter. Oral composition is exp)ressed in the form of telephone 
conversations, interviews, and reports. 

English II: The purpose of this course is the same as English I— the 
material becoming a little more complex. A more detailed use of the library 
is begun. 

English III: This course is more composition than grammar. Building bet- 
ter sentences is stressed. Literature is studied alternately with composition 
by units. 


42 


English IV: A survey of English Literature is given along with composi- 
tion in this course. Oral and written composition will he stressed. The 
first formal research paper is a requirement. 

The Family and its Relations 

Elective: The course is designed to help students develop a well adjusted 
personality, and to gain more enjo}Tnent and satisfaction in living with 
their families now, and in the future. 

French I and II: The objectives of this course are to develop a reasonably 
good pronunciation, a thorough knowledge of fundamental elements of 
grammar, a minimum active and a larger passive vocabulary, and ability 
to read simple prose readily, to understand ordinary common expressions 
when spoken fluently, to express oneself in both oral and written French 
with a fair degree of fluency and accuracy within the limits of the mini- 
mum vocabulary. 

General Science: This course is designed to give the student concepts and 
generalizations necessary for an understanding appreciation of the sur- 
rounding natural and man-made environment and of that heyond the 
earth. 

Health and Fitness: Required. The course provides the facts for an un- 
derstanding of the principles involved in keeping safe and sound, both to 
reinforce good habits and to serve as a guide for wdsely considered action 
in new situations. 

History, United States: This course is designed to present the roots and 
growth of the American social, cultural and political traditions. 


43 


DESCRIPTION OF TRADE COURSES 


Auto Mechanics 

The auto mechanics course at Carver is designed primarily to provide 
adult high school students with a working knowledge of all phases of 
automobile repair and maintenance. Such areas as engine rebuilding, 
testing electricity, automatic transmissions, and diagnosing are covered. 
A certificate is given at the completion of 1,080 hours and any student 
who successfully completes the course is prepared for employment as 
an automobile mechanic. 


Brick Masonry 

The course in bricklaying is practical for the most part, with just 
the necessary theory given. Rigid laboratory drill is emphasized. Two 
hours per day for 5 days per week are given to practice and theory. The 
student is given 10 clock hours per week along with his academic courses. 

A brief history of brick is taught. The several bonds are stressed. 
Walls, corner leads, minor leads, piers, and pilasters are taught. Flues, 
chimneys, steps, arches, catch basins, manholes, decorative brickwork 
and brick walk construction are covered. 

Two semester hours credit will be given for a full-time student in 
the course. Three semester hours credit will be given for a part-time 
student in the course. The completion requirement for the course is 
1,080 clock hours which is the state’s vocational requirement in this 
trade. 

After completing the course, the student, on the basis of the time 
put into the course, is ready for the North Carolina State Apprenticeship on- 
the-job training program. The school’s objective in trade training is 
to prepare for gainful employment. 


44 


SCALE FOR GRADING 


A . , . .93-100 

B. . .92-85 

C. . . .77-84 

D. . .70-76 

Below 70 . . Failing 
W. . .Withdrawn 
I . . Incomplete 


FEES 

All fees are due and payable upon registration. Listed below is a 
schedule of fees: 

Each academic course per semester $15.00 

Vocational course (tuition per hour per semester) ... 15.00 

Shop fee for vocational courses per semester 20.00 

Registration fee per semester 5.00 

Full time academic students fee per semester 84.00 

Part time academic students (three-fourths program) . 60.00 

Part time academic students (one-half program) 54.00 

Part time trade students (three hours program) 70.00 

Activity fee per semester 4.00 

Refunds of fees are pro-rated on the time the students remain in 
school. 

Accident insurance is required of all students enrolled in the trade 
courses. 


45 


DEGREES GRANTED 
June, 1959 

Associate in Arts 

LIBERAL ARTS UNIVERSITY PARALLEL 


Bridges, James 
’^Buggs, Ernest Fernando 
'^Cousar, Julius Ceasar 
Davis, Ernest Leonard 
’^’^’^Davis, James Henry 

Dawkins, Dorothy Elizabeth 
“^Ford, demon 
Franks, Isreal Baxter 
Gentry, Jerome Powell 
Gillard, Paul 
"^Harris, Galvin Goolidge 
Helton, Marvin Alexander 
^’'"Holman, William Harvey 
House, Johnnie Walker 
fHowie, Grady Lee 
Jackson, George Alexander 
’^Johnson, William Golumbus 
Jones, Freddie 
Jones, Johnnie 
Jones, Melvin Gurtis 
Lewis, James 
’^’^Little, Willie Lee 
McGriff, Glyde Walker 
McKinley, Loupe Veleze 
McKinley, Norris Lee 


’^Maddax, William Estee, Jr. 
Miller, Calvin 
Moore, Melvin Landis 
Morris, Murphy 
Moses, Andrew Lee 
Nixon, Donal 
Patterson, John A. 

Pratt, Henry 
^Ray, Willie, Jr. 

Reid, Aaron 
Seigle, Dorothy 
Smith, Andrew 
Smith, Norris Edward 
Steele, Owen, Jr. 

Stevenson, Bobby Ray 
Stewart, Fred 
Stewart, Lillie Ann 
Stinson, Arthur Lee 
Sturdivant, Eugene Thomas 
Thompson, David Samuel 
Truesdale, Noah 
Walker, William 
Walls, Adolphus 
Whitworth, Willie Calvin 
tfWilliams, Roy Lee 


Associate in Arts 

Business Administration University Parallel 
Blair, James Theodore Massey, Hurley C. 

Caldwell, James, Jr. Morris, Robert Lee 

^Davis, James Edward "^Morrow, Thomas Lee 

Harris, Lee Armstead Robinson, Braffard 

McClinton, Johnnie Nathaniel 


Associate in Arts 

General Business and Secretarial Science Terminal 


Alexander, Majorie 
’'"Crowder, Loretta 
Dargins, Bessie Laretta 
’'^Gadsden, Christine Womble 
Grier, Sarnie Richardson 
Hardy, Barbara Ann 
Hoover, Mary Ann 
’'■’^Johnson, Mae Frankie 
Lindsay, Willie Mae 


McCain, Maggie Elizabeth 
McGill, Essie Mae 
McMullen, Doris Jean 
tfMobley, Jane NaWilla 
Pearson, Delores Perrv 
’'"’'"’'■Rivers, Eddie Lee 
’'■ffWatkins, Rosetta Counts 
Weddington, Sylvia Barnetta 


*With distinction 
“^^With greater distinction 
»* **With greatest distinction 

fCompleted requirements for graduation December 18, 1959 
tfCompleted requirements for graduation March 18, 1959 

46 


HIGH SCHOOL DIPLOMAS 


Able, Willie 
Alexander, Fred 
t Andrews, Wallace 
Barber, Willie 
fBelton, Lillian 
fBlack, Hiawatha 
fBlack, Laurel 
Broadie, Wilson Lee Gett 
Brown, Robert 
Callaway, Seph 
Carothers, John Lee 
Cherry, William Fermon 
Clybum, Maggie Lucille 
Covington, Emma 
Crawford, Joan 
fCuthbertson, Eddie 
fFulton, Harris 
fCaines, Annette 
^George, Sarah Elizabeth 
Grier, Cicero Alexander 
fCriffin, Sedil 
tHammond, Oscar 
Higgins, James 
^Huey, Roosevelt 
Hunter, Ralph Pickens 
Jennings, Mattie 
Kizer, Nathaniel 


fLaney, Dorothy 
Logan, Josephine 
fLong, Betty 
"^Love, Naomi 
fMcCauley, Zettie 
McNeely, William Ray 
Murchison, Janet Louise 
fMurray, Floyd 
Neal, Betty Jane 
fNicholas, Lynn Carter 
Ray, Mila Elizabeth 
"^fRorie, Walter 
Ross, Gene Edward 
Ross, Robert S. 

Simpson, Jimmie A, 
Smith, Joe Louis 
fSmith, Willie Albert 
Spencer, Alice Frances 
fThomas, Henry 
Thomas, Richard Allen 
’^Thompson, Ethel 
Waddell, Harrison 
Waddy, Jack D. 
"^fWallace, William 
Wentz, Dorothy Rajanell 
t Whitmire, James 
t Young, Ervin 


VOCATIONAL EDUCATION 
Certificates in Auto Mechanics 

Hammond, Oscar Jetton, Clyde C. 


Certificate in Brick Masonry 

Norman, Edward 


’^With honor 
**'Salutatorian 

* * * V aledictorian 

fCompleted requirements for graduation February 13, 1959 


47 


ROSTER OF STUDENTS 

ADVANCED FRESHMEN 


Alexander, James H. 
Appling, Eugene Henry 
Baxter, Ray Field 
Beatty, William Curlee 
Belk, Craven 
Boger, William Thomas 
Brenson, Cornell 
Broum, Ervin 
Brown, James Nathaniel 
Brown, Joseph Bell 
Brown, Lonnie Mae 
Brown, Willie Claude 
Bryant, Capers, Jr. 
Campbell, Clinton 
Carelock, Luther 
Carrothers, James 
Douglas, Fred, Jr. 

Dunn, Earl Mack 
Ervin, Thelmore 
Friday, Robert A. 

Glenn, Bill 
Greene, Charlie 
Grier, Luther DaHs 
Grigsby, Donald Dixon 
Harris, Eddie Gene 
Heath, John Edward 
Holt, Yvonne Cecelia 
Hunter, Giles Linwood 
Hunter, James Christopher 
Jordon, Richard Edward 
Kendrick, James Herbert 
Kinard, Joseph Bernoid 


Aaron, Barbara Jean 
Adams, Ethell 
Alexander, Charles 
Alexander, Fred 
Alford, Nathaniel 
Allen, Haywood Leevander 
Anderson, Sarah Jean 
Andrews, Wallace 
Bailey, Hazel Delainey 
Barber, Ralph 
Barringer, Hugh Young 
Belk, Modean 
Benson, Jack 


Kirkpatrick, Lellar Ann 
Kirkpatrick, Sidney 
Knox, Cletus, Jr. 

Long, Nathan, Jr. 

Long, Sampson, Jr. 

Lowe, Bill Francis 
Lowery, James Peter 
McClellen, Clyde 
McCorkle, J. Loy Hubert 
McCullough, Robert L. 
Mason, Raymond 
Mills, Leroy 
Moore, William 
Murriel, Melvin 
Nixon, William James 
Pearson, Jeems Irby 
Pernell, L. C. 

Perry, Richard 
Reid, George, Jr. 

Reid, William 
Robbins, Thomas B. 
Sanders, Frazier Harold 
Sherrill, Mary 
Simmons, Earl 
Sloan, John Lendy 
Smith, Raymond 
Sowell, Bessie Lee 
Thomas, Thomas Jerry 
Thompson, Willie Walker 
Walker, Rollie Joe 
Ward, Robert L. 

Williams, Roscoe 

FRESHMEN 

Black, Hiawatha 
Black, Johnny Lee 
Black, Laurel 
Blocker, Billy Ray 
Blocker, James Aticus 
Boulware, Roosevelt 
Boyles, Barbara Jean 
Braswell, Vinston 
Broadie, Ellis Janious 
Bullard, Darson Alexander 
Butler, Charles Allen 
Caldwell, James Dennis 
Caldwell, Lourina Lee 

48 


FRESHMEN (Continued) 


Caldwell, Viola Carolyn 
Cannon, Ernest Lee 
Carter, Lillie Mae 
Cathcart, Doris Jean 
Cherry, Robert 
Clark, Lonnie C. 

Crawford, Lennell 
Crosby, Richard 
Clubreth, Paul Samuel 
Cuthbertson, Eddie 
Cuthbertson, John Andrew 
Dargins, Allen, Jr. 

Davis, Charles Lee 
Davis, Priscilla Ann 
Davis, Robert Eugene 
Davis, Willie Mae 
Dewalt, Freddie Coley 
Douglas, Eldrater, Jr. 
Dowdle, Hoover 
Dunlap, Frank Dennis 
Dunlap, Joe Arthur 
Edwards, Andrew, Jr. 
Edwards George W. 

Epps, Clara Allen 
Ervin, Willie Edward 
Fetterson, John A. 

Fewell, Marcille 
Ford, Freddie 
Foust, Beatrice 
Franklin, Ben Ellis 
Freeman, William 
French, Thaddeus Rhyne 
Friday, Samuel 
Gaddy, Walter Ray 
Garnett, Woodrow 
Gatewood, Geneva Estella 
(3ore Lois Gene 
Gray, Ida Mae 
Green, Thomas J. 

Greene, Nettie Marie 
Gregory, Alfred 
Grier, Cleveland William 
Grier, Ola Jeannette 
Harris, Callie Sue 
Harris, William L. 

Hart, Ola Mae 
Higgins, James Henr}' 

Hill, Edna Cornellius 
Holt, Carol Earle 
Howell, Joseph 


Hunt, Joseph Jefferson 
Ingram, Stewart Winford 
Jackson, John Glenn 
Jackson, Sylvester Robert 
James, Edward Raymond 
Johnson, Charles A. 

Johnson George Henry 
Johnson, Robert Lee 
Jones, Jerry Franklin 
Jones, Manley 
Jones, Mary L. 

Kimbrough, Jeanette 
Lindsay, Gharles Robert 
Linney, Ruby Jane 
Lipe, James William 
Little, John Lamar 
Livingston, Willie 
Love, Crawford Wesley 
Lowery, Julia Mae 
McDonald, George Clement 
McDuffie, Joe, Jr. 

Maness, Joe R. 

Martin, James Edward 
Martin, Marjorie Mae 
Millsaps, Rachel Lilymae 
Mims, Ulysses 
Montgomery, John Henry 
Montgomery, Willie Floyd 
Moore, Ernest Teel 
Moore, Tyrone Reginald 
Neely, Thomas 
Nichols, Lynn Carter 
Parks, Henry Harrison 
Patterson, Clarence Lester 
Pendergrass, Paul 
Poe, Herman Baxter 
Powell Hubert 
Rhett, John 
Rhodes, William C. 
Richards, Julian 
Robeson, Harrison 
Robinson, Albert Daniel 
Robinson, Annie Stinson 
Rorie, Walter Ander 
Ross, Lawrence T. 

Rouse, Mary Louise 
Rubin, Robert William 
Rucker, Nancy Jean 
Sadler, Edward 
Sadler, Vemell McClure 


49 


FRESHMEN (Continued) 


Sanders, Margaret Ruth 
Sayles, John D. 

Scott, Luther Edward 
Sellers, Lafayette 
Shamberger, Rufus Talmadge 
Smith, Arthur 
Smith, George R. 

Smith, Willie Albert 
Sowell, Thomas 
Springs, Marguerite 
Staton, Sarah Margaret 
Stewart, James Ervin Franklin 
Stewart, Roy 
Sturdivant, Hayward Lee 
Thomas, Levi 
Threatt, Thomas Butler 
Tuttle, Thomas Drane 


Wade, Sonnie 
Wall, Eugene 
Wall, Horace, Jr. 

Wallace, William R. 

Ward, George Washington 
Welch, Willie Mae 
Whitmire, James 
Williams, Janet 
Williams, John Thomas 
Withers, Luvie Lee 
WithersTOon, Delores Victoria 
Woodard, Luddie 
Wray, Everett 
Young, Gharles Otis 
Young, Ervin 
Young, Walter, Jr. 


Booker, Walter Lee 
Diamond, Claude Lester 
Hester, James Ambrose 
James, Doris Ann 
James, Hettie Mae 


SPECIALS 

Peace, Armstead 
Price, Leroy 
Robinson, Milton B, 
Smith, Dean, Jr. 


Business Management Institute 


Allen, Dr. David P. 
Beatty, Mathew J. 
Bellamy, Clarence 
Belk, James 
Blair, James T. 
Bonaparte, Thaddeus 
Boulware, Roosevelt 
Broadie, Ellis J. 
Broome, James 
Caldwell, Viola 
Crawford, Lenell 
Crowder, Loretta 
Davis, Louis B. 
Fleming, Hattie M. 
Gaston, Willie 
Gatewood, Geneva 
Goodwin, Edgar 
Gore, Lois G. 

Harris, Dorothy 
Hoover, Mary Ann 
Johnson, Mae Frankie 
Johnson, George H. 


Jones, Johnnie E. 
Leeper, Charles W. 
Ligon, L. C. 

Lindsay, Charles R. 
Lindsay, Willie Mae 
Long, Lem, Jr. 

Massey, Hurley C. 
Maxwell, Aaron 
McCain, Maggie 
McClinton, Johnnie N. 
McGill, Essie Mae 
McMullen, Doris J. 
Millsaps, Lilymae 
Moore, Lester 
Moore, William 
Morrow, Thomas L. 
Owens, Daniel E. 

Polk, James 
Richardson, Greeley 
Rivers, Eddie Lee 
Rucker, Nancy Jean 
Sanders, Margaret 

50 


Business Management Institute (Continued) 


Sanders, William 
Taylor, Walter B. 
Weddington, Sylvia 


Woodard, Luddie 
Worthy, Vessie 
Wray, Everett 


EXTENSION DIVISION, A. & T. COLLEGE 


Belton, Edward Lee 
Belton, Fannie W. 

Blount, Melvina 
Blount, Odessa 
Brewer, Loura J. 

Brewton, Annie Grace 
Brown, Bernard L. 

Carelock, Flelen C. 

Crump, Charles Leroy 
Dargan, Vashti Brewer 
Dunlapp, Emma Hairston 
Ely, Ruth Hill 
Gatson, Allean Garrie 
Grier, Johnsie McGlain 
Lewas, Carrie Patterson 
Littlejohn, Lela Fleming 
Lindsay, William Bernard 
Loney, Dorothy Mae 
McLauren, Bettye McConnaghey 


McMillen, Minnie B. 
McMoore, Dorothy Loney 
Marsh, Dora R. 

Marsh, Lola 
Massey, Lillian Perry 
Moser, Helen Belton 
Perry, Bertha Brooks 
Phillips, Artie Lee 
Rhea, Erma Jane 
Saunders, Emma Jean 
Sherrill, Otha L. 

Sigler, Lloyd 
Solomon, Grace Velma 
Springs, Dora S. 

Streeter, Mary Elizabeth 
Thompson, Fred H. 
Thompson, Onie C. 
Walker, Juanita Brown 
Wright, Bumas B. 


HIGH SCHOOL DEPARTMENT 
Eleventh Grade 


Alexander, Mattie 
Allen, Thomas Wilson 
Antrum, Eugene H. 
Chapman, Eugene 
Cook, L. C. 

Cooper, Edith Mae 
Covington, James L. 
Davis, Leroy 
Davis, Roosevelt 
Dixon, Lee H. 

Gardin, Raymond J. 


Alexander, Curtis 
Bennett, Gevoice 
Carothers, Helen 
Copening, Robert Huston 
Feely, Leroy 
Griffin, James D. 

Harris, David Lee 


Howard, George 
McCollough, James 
Rearden, Arthur James 
Richardson, Shelton 
Sherrill, Chancy W., Jr. 
Simpson, Fred Lee 
Spearman, William L. 
Staton, Louis, Jr. 
Thompson, Junior 
Truesdale, Willie J. 
Wilson, Eddie Lee 

Tenth Grade 

Howie, Charles Flenry 
Johnson, John 
Kirkpatrick, Elijah J. 
McCaskill, Roosevelt 
McCrary, Betty Lee 
Maddax, Wardel N. 
Miller, Charles D. 


51 


Tenth Grade (Continued) 


Perry, Theodore R. 
Rumley, James 
Simpson, Willie James 
Sumler, Joseph Banks 

Williams, George Edward 
Wilson, Eddie Lee 
Withers, Arthur Lee 


Ninth Grade 

Carr, Ernest 
Down, Agnes 
Howard, Earnest 
Howie, James 

Land, Thomas J. 
Smith, Curtis Ross 
Timmons, Jessie 


SPECIAL STUDENTS 

Blackwelder, Theodore 
Ervin, J. B. 

Faulkner, Andrew L. 
Fulton, Harris 
Gaines, Annette 
Gaines, Frank G. 
Gaither, Martha W. 
Hames, Marion 
Hammonds, Oscar 
Harris, Earl 
Hill, Glance 

Hunt, Richard 
Ivey, Randolph B. 
Jetton, Clyde C. 

Jones, Durham C. 
Morgan, John, Jr. 
Murray, Floyd 
Norman, Edward L. 
Norwood, Mobel 
Shipman, Russell J. 
Veasey, Raymond 
Withers, Marie Stanley 


1958 SUMMER SESSIONS 


Alexander, Brandon Booker 
Allison, Luther Edwin 
Alston, John Charles 
Beatty, William Curlee 
Blair, James Theodore 
Blocker, Billy Ray 
Boger, William Thomas 
Booker, Walter Lee 
Broadie, Ellis Janious 
Brown, Erwin 
Brown, Joseph Bell 
Brown, Levi, Jr. 

Bryant, Joel Claudius 
Caldwell, James, Jr. 
Chisolm, James Thomas 
Culbreth, Paul Samuel 
Cureton, Samuel 
Davis, Charles Lee 
Davis, Ernest Leonard 
Da\ds, James Edward 
Davis, James Henry 
Douglass, Fred, Jr. 

Dowdle, Hoover 


Evans, Lillie Ann 
Gentry, Jerome Powell 
Gillespie, Westcoe 
Glenn, Bill 
Greene, Charlie 
Grier, Bernice 
Grier, Otto Douglas 
Harris, Calvin Coolidge 
Harris, Eddie Gene 
Heath, John Edward 
Hellams, Juanita Delores 
Hickman, Herbert Albert 
Howie, Grady Lee 
Hunter, James C. 

Jackson, George Alexander 
James, Elmorris 
Johnson, Charles, Jr. 
Johnson, William Columbus 
Jones, Johnnie Enin 
Jordan, Richard E. 

Lewas, James Art 
Long, Nathan, Jr. 

Lowery, James Peter 

52 


1958 SUMMER SESSIONS (Continued) 


McClinton, Johnnie N. 
Major, Joseph William 
Mason, Raymond 
Montgomery, Barbara Ann 
Moore, Melvin Landis 
Moses, Andrew Lee 
Murray, Melvin 
Nicholas, Robert 
Pendergrass, Paul 
Pernell, L. C. 

Phillips, William Henry 
Poe, Herman Baxter 
Ray, Willie, Jr. 

Reid, Aaron 
Sayles, John D. 

Scott, Luther Edward 
Shamberger, Rufus 
Sims, George, Jr. 

Singleton, James 
Smith, Andrew, Jr. 


Smith, Dean, Jr. 

Smith, Harold 
Smith, Raymond 
Stevenson, Bobby Ray 
Stewart, Fred 
Stinson, Arthur Lee 
Stowe, Ernest, Jr. 
Sturdivant, Eugene Thomas 
Sturdivant, Hayward Lee 
Thompson, Davis Samuel 
Thompson, Johnny Edward 
Thompson, Willie Walker 
Waiters, Carl L. 

Ward, Robert L. 

Ware, Isaac 
Westbrook, Robert 
Williams, John 
Williams, Roscoe 
Wright, Robert Cornelius 


53 


SUMMARY OF STUDENT ENROLLMENT BY DEPARTMENTS 


COLLEGE 

Liberal Arts (University Parallel) 220 

Business Administration (University Parallel) 37 

Secretarial Science & General Business (Terminal) .... 42 

Special Students 9 

TOTAL 'm 

College Department 

Sophomores 141 

Freshmen 158 

Specials 9 

TOTAL 308 308 

Adult Education 

Extension Division (A. & T. College) 39 

Business Management Institute 56 

ACCELERATED HIGH SCHOOL 100 

TOTAL T^ 195 

College (1958 Summer Sessions) 

First Summer Session . 72 

Second Summer Session 60 

TOTAL 132 132 

GRAND TOTAL 


SUMMARY OF GRADUATES 


Year 

College 

High School 

Cosmetology' 

Total 

1951 

21 

— 

— 

21 

1952 

31 

— 

— 

31 

1953 

40 

— 

— 

40 

1954 

21 

— 

— 

21 

1955 

43 

12 

— 

55 

1956 

62 

67 

17 

146 

1957 

62 

82 

30 

174 

1958 

71 

64 

43 

178 

1959 

76 

54 

0 

130 

TOTAL 

427 

279 

90 

796 


54 




PU c:iL.IO 


bs H A i“t V 


0 != 


CHARLOTTE and MECKLENBURG COUNTS 
CHARLOITE 2. NORTH nfiROMNa 






W L, 


I BRAR Y 

^ECKLEmnRG C^ii,v-p 

CnAR! OTTr ') . '-'-'■JM 


IT 9 


nhstm cARni im